Document Type

Thesis

Publication Date

5-1-2015

First Advisor

Judith Chubb

Second Advisor

Daniel Klinghard

Department

Political Science

Abstract

This thesis questions the universality of information and communication technologies (ICTs) as “liberation technology” and whether they enhance the political power of citizens in some capacities. Can ICTs be forces of democratization? To what degree are grassroots efforts empowered or stymied by a government's use of ICTs? By examining four case studies, this thesis aims to explore the disguised forms of control embedded in ICTs and how its uses vary.

Comments

This thesis was written for the Political Science Department Honors program.

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